With the Depression in full swing during the first half of the 1930s, the team sought greener pastures in Hollywood.The hardworking Rodgers later regretted these relatively fallow years, but he and Hart did write some classic songs and film scores while out west, including Love Me Tonight (1932) (directed by Rouben Mamoulian, who would later direct Rodgers's Oklahoma!Among the stars he accompanied were Nora Bayes and Fred Allen.

russell rogers adventure dating-50

on Broadway), which introduced three standards: "Lover", "Mimi", and "Isn't It Romantic? Rodgers also wrote a melody for which Hart wrote three consecutive lyrics which either were cut, not recorded or not a hit.

The fourth lyric resulted in one of their most famous songs, "Blue Moon".

Their collaboration produced many well-known songs, including "Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin'", "People Will Say We're in Love", "Oklahoma!

" (which also became the state song of Oklahoma), "If I Loved You", "You'll Never Walk Alone", "It Might as Well Be Spring", "Some Enchanted Evening", "Getting to Know You", "My Favorite Things", "The Sound of Music", "Sixteen Going on Seventeen", "Climb Ev'ry Mountain", "Do-Re-Mi", and "Edelweiss", Hammerstein's last song.

The team went on to create four more hits that are among the most popular of all musicals.

Each was made into a successful film: Carousel (1945), South Pacific (1949, winner of the 1950 Pulitzer Prize for Drama), The King and I (1951), and The Sound of Music (1959).

Rodgers also contributed to the book on several of these shows.

Many of the songs from these shows are still sung and remembered, including "The Most Beautiful Girl in the World", "My Romance", "Little Girl Blue", "I'll Tell the Man in the Street", "There's a Small Hotel", "Where or When", "My Funny Valentine", "The Lady Is a Tramp", "Falling in Love with Love", "Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered", and "Wait till You See Her".

The show's biggest hit — the song that Rodgers believed "made" Rodgers and Hart — was "Manhattan". Throughout the rest of the decade, the duo wrote several hit shows for both Broadway and London, including Dearest Enemy (1925), The Girl Friend (1926), Peggy-Ann (1926), A Connecticut Yankee (1927), and Present Arms (1928).