If you’re posting a chart in the NYTimes, you’d better have read your Stephen Few and Edward Tufte. When your charts are the main support for your story, you’d better get them right. Bilton did get the table of numbers to the left of the pie charts correct.

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Amazon, Amazon.com, analytics, bad graph, bad pie chart, bar chart, Bits blog, business intelligence, business intelligence guru, data visualization, data viz, info viz, information visualization, Kindle, Kindle DX, Marc Harfeld, New York Times, Nick Bilton, pie chart, Seth Godin “Is Amazon Working Backward? Bilton should know better than to use pie charts because it’s really hard to determine the percentages when we’re looking at parts of a circle. Perhaps he’d be better served by relying on them over the pie charts to make his point. When you’re analyzing something, you shouldn’t compare opposite populations while ignoring their differences. Godin cited 4 specific problems with the piece, ranging from the graphs being wrong (later corrected) to Bilton misunderstanding the nature of early adopters. Godin writes, “Many of the reviews are from people who don’t own the device.” Obviously, it’s hard to take a review of a Kindle seriously if the reviewer doesn’t own a Kindle.

” That’s the title of NYTimes blogger Nick Bilton post on Dec 24, 2009. Bilton is writing about Amazon’s product, the Kindle. These are the different populations I’m talking about in item #3 above. Godin’s concerns with Bilton’s post now and fill in some of the gaps that Godin left to be filled. Bilton tried to make the case that each new version of the Kindle is worse than the one before it.

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The people there are plagued by war and famine, drought and disease.The percentage of one star ratings each new Kindle edition receives doubles from 2% with Kindle 1, to 4% with Kindle 2, and then moves up to 5% with Kindle DX.However, this evidence provides very weak support for Bilton’s claim that Kindle owners are getting progressively less happy.What about the reviewers who are happy to very happy with the Kindle, the four and five star reviewers?Once again, the non-verified Kindle reviewers provide consistently lower ratings than the reviewers who actually own a Kindle.You’d think that a review that was helpful to 1 out of 3 people is different than a review that was found helpful by 18,203 out of 19,111 people, like this one.